Can You Reopen A Case After Pleading Guilty?

Can You Reopen A Case After Pleading Guilty?

Plea bargaining has grown in popularity as criminal courts have become increasingly crowded, and constitutional concerns require cases to be moved speedily through the system. They are desirable because they are the result of a negotiation where the prosecution and defense both maintain some control over the outcome and hopefully, the attorneys can develop a

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What Kind of Cases Are Taken to the Supreme Court?

What Kind of Cases Are Taken to the Supreme Court?

At the apex of the judicial hierarchy, the Supreme Court stands as the ultimate arbiter of justice in the United States. But what types of cases are deemed worthy of this stage? In this blog, we explore the pivotal issues that shape our legal landscape and define the nation’s constitutional fabric. The Role of the

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What Are the Grounds for Appeal?

What Are the Grounds for Appeal?

The pursuit of justice doesn’t always end with a verdict. Enter the appeals process – a critical avenue through which individuals can challenge court decisions that they believe to be unjust or erroneous. Basics of the Appeal Process If a defendant is convicted in the State of Texas, they have the right to challenge their

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The Federal Court Appeal Process: An Overview

The Federal Court Appeal Process: An Overview

The federal court appeal process is an important part of the legal system. It allows individuals and organizations to challenge decisions made by lower courts or administrative agencies. This process can be complex and time-consuming, but it can also be a powerful tool for those seeking justice. What Is the Federal Court Appeals Process and

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Can Prosecutors Appeal a Not Guilty Verdict?

Can Prosecutors Appeal a Not Guilty Verdict?

Commonly referenced in popular culture but less widely understood is the legal principle of “double jeopardy.” This principle is deeply rooted in the United States Constitution as well as state constitutions. It means that the government cannot bring a second criminal trial against a defendant after the defendant has been declared not guilty in their

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Writ of Habeas Corpus and Direct Appeals – Key Differences

Writ of Habeas Corpus and Direct Appeals – Key Differences

Defendants seeking to challenge the conditions of their imprisonment or the imprisonment itself may seek help from the court by filing an application or petition for a “writ of habeas corpus.” What’s the difference between a direct appeal and a writ of habeas corpus? Keep reading to find out. What Is a Writ of Habeas

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What the Federal Civil Appeals Process Looks Like

What the Federal Civil Appeals Process Looks Like

In civil cases, either party can appeal to a higher court. This article will discuss the grounds for appeal in civil cases as well as the steps of the federal civil appeals process. U.S. Courts of Appeals: An Overview The United States Courts of Appeals (also called the Circuit Courts) were created by Congress under authority rooted

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The 5 Most Common Types of Third-Degree Felonies In Texas

The 5 Most Common Types of Third-Degree Felonies In Texas

From bank fraud to forging stocks, bonds, or cash, there are a variety of activities in Texas that can land you with a third-degree felony. Let’s take a look at the five most common ones: 1. Theft According to the law, theft occurs when a person unlawfully appropriates property with intent to deprive the owner

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